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Fremantle Residence

Originally an 1897 limestone and iron single roomed storey cottage, this building was identified as a significant heritage home for its cultural importance and its representative of the typical workers' houses in the Fremantle area, an example of the Victorian Georgian style of architecture that was prevalent in Fremantle at the time.

Fratelle Group undertook a heritage study of the existing building to establish scope for the new project.  Extended a number of times, the majority of the original building had been added to and the interior of the building was removed to the point of collapse.  We established the parameters of the original design via council records, along with undertaking a streetscape evaluation of the street.  The neighbouring property had already commenced a renovation and that was our best gauge as to what lay beneath the weatherboard cladding.

Wanting to define the original building, providing separation between old and new, Fratelle connected the cottage to the rest of the home through a passage that identifies a transition between the two spaces.  Externally, the existing cottage was stripped of all of the weatherboard cladding concealing the beautiful original stonework and the extension is clad in black cedar.  A contrasting two-level contemporary addition to the rear of the original cottage, carefully designed with simple aesthetics to highlight the heritage frontage, has resulted in a stunning streetscape that pays humble respect to the significance of the site.

The Baker Street project represents a home that is conserving much of the existing Fremantle cottage and restored it to it’s original character, whilst adapting the site to become relevant and useful to needs of the modern-day Client. Located close to the ocean, the building has been designed to maximise the sea breezes that approach in the hot summer afternoon, naturally cooling down the house through the introduction of small south-west windows and larger northern windows, to create negative and positive pressures within the home, guiding the breezes to the appropriate spaces.  In addition to this, the timber framed new addition to the house is heavy insulated and battened to create an air cavity in all walls and roof.